His Letters are Treasures ~ II (w/audio)

Welcome to the second post featuring my grandfather’s WWII letters, documents, and photos. I read several letters yesterday before selecting this one – chosen for his mention of receiving the Bronze Star and his casual and sarcastic tone in doing so and his touching closing. I would have enjoyed reading more detail about how he earned this medal, but I understand that many things were left unwritten.

My grandfather, Charles L. Wilcox, was a Sergeant (heavy machine gunner); Co. K 351st Infantry Regiment. Details first mentioned in: “His Letters are Treasures”

Reading my grandfather’s letters and documents has become a meaningful project for me. I am honored to share this experience. Thank you for joining me. Be well. ✍🏻 Michele

Featured photo: my grandpa’s photo “In Italy” (written on back) Photo 2: My grandfather, Sergeant Charles L. Wilcox “Taken in Pieve di Cadore – High in the Italian Alps – May 18th, 1945” Other photos: inherited items from my grandfather’s WWII service (the news pamphlet is not dated)

Follow up to last Saturday’s post, “Walking Tour – Downtown” – I mentioned St. Patrick’s party people photos in that post. I will not be sharing those photos… although lively and composition worthy, they are loaded with inebriated people who did not agree to be featured on my blog. Although a few of them (strangers) were happy to pose that night, they were not of sound mind. πŸ˜‚ Cheers!

Β© 2023 MyInspiredLife

96 thoughts on “His Letters are Treasures ~ II (w/audio)

    1. All-around wonderful… reading and sharing his letters. I feel honored to do both. Thank you for appreciating with me, Suma. 😊 His parents saved everything; fortunately, his letters and documents have been preserved and passed on to grateful me. πŸ’—

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  1. How wonderful you have his letters to read and all the other memories ! What a nice looking man and it was so nice to hear you read his letter. That was a time in history that should never be forgotten. When you mentioned “Jerrys”, we were up in Northern Ontario a few years ago and on Lake Superior, in Neys Provincial Park, they had a POW camp for German Officers. Still some remnants of old buildings and items. It is so interesting for me to see, read about or hear about this part of our history.

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    1. It is wonderful! I am enjoying getting to know him through his letters and connecting letters to documents is interesting too. Also interesting learning about the origin of the term, Jerrys. You learn something every day! Thank you for sharing your thoughts about my post, and my grandpa. 😊 You are absolutely, right, a history that should never be forgotten.

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    1. Oh, my goodness, you have no idea. I have so many more! I will share from time to time and the nice thing about that is, I am creating a folder of all of it to pass it on to the Library of Congress when I am done. A beautiful journey, indeed! I am really enjoying it. Reading and learning. 🌟 Happy weekend, Jeff. πŸ’–πŸŒ³ Thank you.

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      1. Tamara Kulish from https://tamarakulish.com/

        I get it! I’m writing a new book a Bio novel, and telling g my family’s history is part of that! There are some things that shouldn’t be forgotten!

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  2. Oh Michele, your grandfather’s letters are so descriptive and heartwarming. πŸ’– You can tell how proud he is of receiving the Bronze Star and to describe the soldiers and place where he was stationed. This is such an emotional read and you delivered it superbly my friend. πŸ™πŸΌ I know your grandfather would be proud. Uncovering such historical treasures is priceless. Thanks so much for sharing your grandfathers life with us. πŸ₯°πŸ’πŸ˜Š

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    1. They are quite enjoyable to read through. I’ve barely made a dent – there are so many! His comment about the bronze star is sweet. I believe he would smile, yes. Thanks a million, Kymbelina! πŸ™πŸ»πŸ’–

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      1. Oh wow Michele, you are so fortunate to have this treasure trove of history in the palm of your hands. I think you will continue to do your grandfather’s time in the service a lot of justice. You already have and you’re doing a divine job sharing it. Oh how I wish I had some of the things from my grandfather’s time during WWI. How very blessed you are my dear! πŸ€—πŸ₯‚πŸ₯° I applaud you. I bet somewhere your gramps was a dancer! πŸ•ΊπŸ»πŸŽΆπŸ•ΊπŸ»

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      2. Oh honey, you are so very welcome. Continue to embrace and cherish those stories that you can envision him writing today. Ladybug, you hold something worth more that all the money in the world. This is an experience you cannot buy! Hugs and smooches my Belle! πŸ˜πŸ’–πŸ€—βœ¨πŸ˜˜πŸ¦‹πŸ₯³πŸ₯‚ Enjoy your Sun-Shiny day!!! πŸŒžπŸŒ…πŸŒž

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  3. Reading your post has stirred memories of my father who also served overseas during WWII. Dad was in Italy (happily for him) and France and also fought in the Battle of the Bulge. It’s a small world but probably not small enough to think that your granddad and my dad may have crouched side by side in some lonely foxhole. My dad didn’t like to talk about those days; I certainly don’t have any letters or memoirs from him. I get comfort reading your posts and feeling closer to my dad. Thank you for these lovely early morning moments, Michele.

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    1. Considering the possibility that your dad and my granddad were crouched in a foxhole together is an emotional thought. A beautiful story of possible connection amidst such sadness. My grandfather did not talk about his war experiences either – seems common. I am honored by your share here, Nancy. Thank you so much. I will continue to share my grandfather’s items over the coming months. Take care.

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  4. Sober stuff and humour too. Thanks for sharing. Sorry to see your next post is closed to comments. I chose to screen my comments before posting them so I won’t miss the gems. After receiving scam calls on my phone , I also screen unknown numbers as well. It’s far different from the days growing up in our town when families shared β€˜party lines’ and people waited their turn or listened in. πŸ˜‚πŸ€£πŸ€—πŸ’•βœ¨

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    1. Absolutely! Thank you for acknowledging those two realities. I imagine comic relief was a lifesaver. 😌 I am sorry that you are sorry (about my comments). 😁 Sunday tends to be a quiet more reflective day for my blog/my life, but I am grateful for your interest. πŸ™πŸ» Party lines… I had forgotten about that. Now people barely talk on the phone. πŸ˜‚ I appreciate your engagement with this special post. Have a wonderful week! πŸ’

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    1. I thought the same thing, when I first began reading him. He was a Canadian by birth – the friendliest people I’ve ever met. That and I imagine the soldiers weren’t allowed to write too much truthful detail. I love his letters, but detail would have been interesting, and probably heartbreaking too. Thanks so much for visiting and commenting, Conny. I really appreciate it!

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  5. This is so special and moving, Michele. I enjoyed hearing you read your grandfather’s letter. And I can only imagine how poignant and touching the time has been for you to read them quietly in your own space, keeping his memory alive in your heart. Thank you for sharing…πŸ’ž

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  6. Pingback: Greetings from Grandpa – My Inspired Life

  7. Thank you, Michele, for sharing your grandfather’s WWII letters, documents, and photos. It’s amazing to read about the experiences of those who served during such a critical time in our history. I appreciate your efforts in preserving these treasures and bringing them to life for future generations to appreciate. Your grandfather’s mention of receiving the Bronze Star and his nonchalant tone in doing so speaks volumes about the courage and selflessness of those who served. I can only imagine how proud you must be of him. Thank you for honoring his legacy in such a beautiful way. πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘ŒπŸ˜Š

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    1. Thank you, Pankaj, for reading and appreciating. πŸ™πŸ»Motivating feedback! You have a keen understanding of how his nonchalant tone represents the humble character of those brave men. I’ve always been proud, yes, even though he passed when I was a child. Taking the time to read and share his letters at this stage of my life is a rich and heartwarming experience. I will share more over the coming months. Thanks again, hope you’ve had a nice day!

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  8. I cannot imagine how poignant and evocative his letters must be as a reflection of a time he lived through and a time I have only heard and read about. I love that you are going through his story and preserving it as it surely is one of the closest ways we can come to understanding what the era was like and how it affected people. ❀

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    1. Thanks so much for this, Layla. It is a moving process. A strange one, too, because there is so much left out of the letters – it’s easy to forget he’s in the middle of a war, writing those. I will read more in the future. Thank you. πŸ’—

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  9. Pingback: His Letters are Treasures ~ III (w/audio) – My Inspired Life

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